The Catastrophic Time Line…

…certainly includes joy among the ashes. Life has to have its joy, which humanity has usually invested in the clan/family and then hedged about with religious guards.

Religion insists on action of some kind. The kind(s) of action demanded by religion in response to catastrophe reveal the essential differences in religious offering.

For instance, Gandhi was thought to have lost his mind when he suggested that European Jews respond to Hitlerism by taking their wives, children, old people, et al, and jumping to their deaths off a high cliff. This would be the Ultimate Response to the Final Solution. Gandhi’s Hinduism guided him to practical nihilism. Life in this form is fleeting, let it go.

Christian influenced Westerners thought the proper response to Hitlerism was frontal assault. Their response was theological in nature because Christianity values life in this world leading to the next and, so, denies either polar extreme, blandness or nihilism. Christianity teaches civil obedience, to be sure, but leaves plenty of room for peaceful civil disobedience and then active, open opposition to evil.

Religion (as stated in my previous post, mine is Evangelical Christianity) touches the same part of the brain as Art. Unlike Art, which may be complete in appreciative regard, resulting in many cases in blandness where reverent awe ought to be set, Religion has a hard ethical edge. Religious people have to behave according to the hard edges of their Religion, or even to expand it, but to bring into this world real and lasting joy.

2 Responses to The Catastrophic Time Line…

  1. David Montoya says:

    That hard edge may not be ethical but delusional or even diabolical. The hard edge of socialized Christiandom has included racism, egoism, and the ability to justify and rationalize anything they do as “the Lord’s will”.

  2. Rick Davis says:

    Ah, once again to feel the sting of the Samurai! I thought you were gone forever!

    The misuse of Religion is proof of its hard ethical edge. Right or wrong, Religion requires one to do something.

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